Do I need to post personal content to my business account?

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Q: I see so many influencers posting details of their personal lives on social media and I wonder if I should do the same. I’m the face of my small business, so should I share personal posts (kids, pets, daily life) on my business account, or keep it completely separate?

Many influencers build their businesses based on their lives, so of course their social media accounts share everything from their latest brand collaborations to videos of their home renovations.

But for small business owners, it’s a little different. You may be the face of the company, but you are also not the only defining element of it. In most cases, your business accounts should probably be just that: dedicated to business.

However, this does not mean that you have to keep yourself completely out of the picture. In fact, weaving personalized content that is also relevant to your business can help you build a more authentic, related brand.

The approach to follow will depend on your audience, industry and goals. Consider the following:

  • How much does my business rely on my personal image? Do I want my business to rely on my personal image?
  • Does my personal brand and business brand have an overlap in audiences?
  • What is my audience looking for on my business account and my personal account? Are they similar or very different?
  • Is there value in sharing personal updates with my business audience?

Let’s dive into a few scenarios based on what you may have answered:

The personal brand has become a business

  • How much does my business rely on my personal image? Do I want my business to rely on my personal image? It relies on a good amount, and I’m okay with that.
  • Does my personal brand and business brand have an overlap in audiences? Yes.
  • What is my audience looking for on my business account and my personal account? Are they similar or very different? They are somewhat similar.
  • Is there value in sharing personal updates with my business audience? Yes.

In this case, it’s likely that your business is an extension of your personal brand. Maybe you’re a fitness enthusiast who started a boutique gym, or maybe you run a community for new parents, a category in which you and many of your friends fall.

Your business and personal brands then probably have similar audiences, and while they may be looking for slightly different things on different accounts, people are used to seeing you as the face of the business.

By being regularly present on your company’s social accounts, you help build trust and authenticity in your audience and you add a human element to your works. Your business is not just another business, it is a product and service with the right person and story behind it.

However, you will mostly want to stick to content that is related to your business in some way. Here are some ideas for founders who want to put their own lives into a business account:

  • View business trips or events related to your product or service. Holiday photos will not be right for every company to share, but a recent post on swimwear company Mara Hoffman’s account shows the founder on a beach. It works because she wears one of the company’s suits, which connects her experience to the brand.

  • Movie behind the scenes content. The founder of the wellness food company Golde recently posted a casual insider look at a photo shoot, an approach that can help customers feel extra invested in how the company’s products come to life.

  • Show your dog or child in the office. This approach works perfectly for Sonshine Baths, which was started because founder Tuanieha Simms could not find a skin care solution for her son. He appears regularly on Sonshine’s Instagram — but even personal posts like these have been linked to the business in some way.

The Independent Business

  • How much does my business rely on my personal image? Do I want my business to rely on my personal image? I want them to be mostly separate.
  • Does my personal brand and business brand have an overlap in audiences? Not really.
  • What is my audience looking for on my business account and my personal account? Are they similar or very different? They are looking for different things.
  • Is there value in sharing personal updates with my business audience? Seldom.

In this case, you and your business are separate entities. There is not a big overlap in the audience, and you would like to keep your personal brand mostly separate from that of the business.

Establishing your business separately from yours builds a standalone brand for it instead of lending your personality. Create and use a different personality and voice that is unique to the brand.

Of course, there is still room for your presence, as long as it direct related to your work.

Here are some examples of content ideas that stay focused on the business:

  • Talk about your founding story. Shawn Askinosie changed careers and brought his daughter along when he started Askinosie Chocolate. Most of the business’s social media is focused on chocolate, but here he shares the business’s inspiring origin story.

  • Show how you use your product as a customer. Olive oil company Brightland has a brand of its own, but its “Founder” Story Highlight shows founder Aishwarya Iyer making some of her favorite recipes.
Source
  • Film a teaser video where you talk about a new product or launch. Farmgirl Flowers’ social accounts are dedicated to their flowers rather than their founder, but she makes an appearance here and shows off one of the company’s Thanksgiving arrangements.

For every business

Remember, someone is tracking your business account to find out more about your business. Take the time to think about what your followers are looking for and the role you want your company to play in their lives. By thinking of your brand as its own personality, it will be easier to decide which personal content is relevant.

If in doubt, ask yourself the following:

  1. Is it related to my company?
  2. Will my audience care or benefit from it?
  3. Is it authentic to my business?

And lastly, remember that your audience is always your best indicator. Do they like more personal posts, or do they tend to scroll past? Keep track of your metrics to see what type of content your audience is most interested in, and then adjust your strategy from there.





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